The "I blame Sir Stirling" Collection

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reeft1
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The "I blame Sir Stirling" Collection

Post by reeft1 » Sat Aug 29, 2015 11:50 am

Nightmare. You know how it goes. You read about a car, driver, event. You like the car. You think the driver is a legend. You think the achievement is incredible even today. But it doesn't fit in to your collection. But not having a model of it seems unacceptable. So you buy a cheap parts work. But then you start to look at other drivers and cars who completed in the same event. And then you look at similar events. And before you know it, you have a new collection.

This is what happened to me because of Stirling Moss' legendary drive in the 1955 Mille Miglia.

The Mille Miglia was an open-road endurance race which took place in Italy twenty-four times from 1927 to 1957 (thirteen before the war, eleven from 1947).

Like the older Targa Florio and later the Carrera Panamericana, the MM made Gran Turismo (Grand Touring) sports cars like Alfa Romeo, BMW, Ferrari, Maserati, Mercedes Benz and Porsche famous. The race brought out an estimated five million spectators.
From 1953 until 1957, the Mille Miglia was also a round of the World Sports Car Championship.

(Taken from the Telegraph Newspaper) Sixty years ago, Stirling Moss (then aged 25) and motorsport journalist Denis Jenkinson (34) shared a works Mercedes-Benz 300 SLR sports car on its debut race. The result was the most iconic single day’s drive in motor racing history.
With Moss behind the wheel, and the diminutive Jenkinson using an ingenious roller-chart of pace notes that he communicated by hand signals, they hurtled around Italy on closed public roads to smash all records for that motorsport-mad nation’s most charismatic race – the 1,000-mile Mille Miglia.
To picture the scale of what Moss and Jenkinson did to win it, imagine blasting off from Marble Arch, London, at 7.22am, next stop Cardiff… and no motorways. From Cardiff head north to Manchester, on to Glasgow, then Edinburgh. Turn south for York and back to London, 150mph down the closed Edgware Road – spectators four deep and hanging from every available window – and across the finish line back at Marble Arch. Despite several fuel stops, you stop the clock just 12 seconds short of 5.30pm that same day. Such performance demands a special car, and a very special crew.
Moss and Jenkinson had three minor accidents en route, but their staggeringly robust Mercedes, carrying number 722, soaked up every impact. Only its rear tyres were changed, and its bonnet was never lifted. Jenkinson was sick over the side and lost his spectacles, plucked off by the airstream during that bye-bye-breakfast moment; typically, he had a spare pair.
Moss's car carried the number 722 because it was assigned a start time of 7.22am
In the entire 10 hours, Jenkinson missed only one critical pace-note call, when distracted by fuel-spray from an over-filled tank. Meanwhile, Moss’s skill and stamina hurled that brutally fast Mercedes around the 1,000 miles at an average of 97.9mph.
Certainly in May 1955 it was an achievement of almost supernatural dimensions. It was crucial in finally re-establishing, post-war, the legend of Mercedes’ invincibility in racing.
Moss recalls: “My first impression (of the 300 SLR), to be honest, was not too positive. It looked very big indeed for just a 3.0-litre, big and heavy when compared with an Aston Martin DB3S or even Jaguar D-type. But when I got into it and started it up, that straight-eight engine sounded amazing: hard-edged, a real racing engine. And every detail spelt proper engineering.
“But it was never easy to drive. You really had to apply yourself, consciously adapt to its mass and get used to the awkward gearbox. It felt much larger than its sister open-wheeled grand prix car, but on the open road it was really exceptionally fast, and very rewarding.
“Only the drum brakes were, frankly, awful. They were always inadequate, especially since I was used to Jaguar’s discs. Crucially, though, they were not inferior to the brakes on most of our rivals.”
The SLR also had an offset clutch housing that split Moss’s pedals wide apart, with the clutch to the left, and the brake and accelerator pedal to the right. He liked this splayed-legs driving position: “It was very comfortable. The wraparound seat was good, and, of course, we never even considered wearing seat belts.”
If Moss was almost fearless, so certainly was his passenger. “Jenks” was a 5ft 2½in-tallMotor Sport magazine correspondent. He had raced motorcycles before becoming passenger to sidecar racer Eric Oliver. They won the 1949 World Championship and when Moss offered Jenkinson a Mercedes place on the Mille Miglia, he was elated.
Last edited by reeft1 on Sat Aug 29, 2015 2:51 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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reeft1
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Re: The "I blame Sir Stirling" Collection

Post by reeft1 » Sat Aug 29, 2015 11:55 am

Moss recalls the communication problem within the noisy SLR. We tested an intercom. Initially it seemed fine, but then I said to Jenks, ‘OK, let me try flat-out and see how it works then, and I didn’t hear a thing. When we stopped, I bawled, What’s the matter? You didn’t say a word and he protested, Oh yes I did – I was talking the whole time. “Having Jenks beside me was a tremendous boost. This was the only way a foreign driver could compete with the Italians’ local knowledge. After three reconnaissance periods, Jenks had noted all salient points on his famous ‘toilet roll’ of notes. If he hadn’t been there I’d never have got anywhere near our average speed.
“Pre-race we had worked out where we could save time while other drivers would be backing off, and we also marked places where, if we didn’t back off, well, frankly, we’d be dead! But when you’re travelling that fast on a public road, any mistake is major. Jenks’s hand signals – flat, left, right, bumpy, slippery, brake hard, harder, we’re going to die! – were invaluable.”
And the physical stresses of that amazing 10-hour drive? “There was never a point when I was aware of any fatigue,” Moss says. “I just drove as fast as I could, trying relentlessly to save time. When concentrating that hard, you become unaware of the passage of time and of anything outside driving itself. I’ve been in rallies when I thought, ‘God, I feel tired’, but never in the Mille Miglia.”
Years later, Jenkinson was driving on the old Mille Miglia roads between covering races forMotor Sport magazine and stopped for lunch in a roadside café. There he overheard two ladies discussing the great old days when the Mille Miglia used to blast past their door: “Do you remember,” said one, “the dry year of the silver German car with that young English boy driving? He broke all the records you know.”
Her companion replied: “Ah yes, but he was not alone. He had special help. For I saw it with my own eyes. He took along his very own little padre, with a long beard, who sat alongside as he raced, reading him verses from the Bible…”

Ferrari 166 MM Barchetta Touring - 1950 Mille Miglia - Bracco - 4th overall, 1st in class - Art Models

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Jaguar XK120 - 1950 Mille Miglia - Biondetti - 8th overall, 5th in class - Brumm

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Ferrari 195S Berlinetta Touring - 1950 Mille Miglia - Marzotto - Winner - Art Models

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Cisitalia 202 - 1950 Mille Miglia - Tamburini - DNF - Partswork

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Abarth 205 Berlinetta Vignale - 1950 Mille Miglia - Scagliarini - 31st overall, 9th in class - Partswork

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Ferrari 340 America Berlinetta Vignale - 1951 Mille Miglia - Villoresi - Winner - Jolly Models ("pranged" version)

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Allard J2 - 1951 Mille Miglia - Allard - DNF - Bizarre
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Ferrari 250S Berlinetta Vignale - 1952 Mille Miglia - Bracco - Winner - Jolly Models

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Jaguar C-Type - 1952 Mille Miglia - Moss - DNF - Brumm

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Ferrari 340 America Spider Vignale - 1952 Mille Miglia - Taruffi - DNF - Top Model Collection TMC106

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Porsche 356 Speedster - 1952 Mille Miglia - N/A - DNS - Brumm R207

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Alfa Romeo 1900 Sprint - 1952 Mille Miglia - Fangio - 22nd overall, 7th in class - Partswork

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Ferrari 225S Spider Vignale - 1952 Mille Miglia - Biondetti - DNF - Art Models ART124

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Ferrari 340MM Spider Vignale - 1953 Mille Miglia - Marzotto - Winner - Partswork plus race number decals

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Maserati A6GCS/53 - 1953 Mille Miglia - Fantuzzi - 6th overall, 1st in class - Partswork

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Siata 208CS Stab. Farina - 1953 Mille Miglia - Vasaturo - 55th overall, 21st in class - Starline Models

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Ferrari 250 MM Berlinetta Pinin Farina - 1953 Mille Miglia - Marzotto - DNF - Progetto K111

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Aston Martin DB3 - 1953 Mille Miglia - Parnell - 5th overall, 5th in class - Top Model TMC085

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Lancia D24 Spider - 1954 Mille Miglia - Ascari - Winner - Partswork

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Fiat 8V - 1954 Mille Miglia - Poillucci - 18th overall, 6th in class - Partswork

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ISO Isetta - 1954 Mille Miglia - Pasqualicchio - 179th overall, 33rd in class - Partswork

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Ferrari 500 Mondial Pinin Farina Spyder - 1954 Mille Miglia - Sterzi - 15th overall, 5th in class - Art Model ART300

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Ferrari 500 Mondial - 1954 Mille Miglia - Marzotto - 2nd overall, 1st in class - Top Model 201

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Mercedes 300 SLR - 1955 Mille Miglia - Moss - Winner - Partswork

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Alfa Romeo 1900 SS Zagato - 1955 Mille Miglia - Rota - 82nd overall, 26th in class - Partswork

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Renault Alpine Redele Speciale - 1955 Mille Miglia - Galtier - DNF - Eligor 101113

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Ferrari 290MM - 1956 Mille Miglia - Castellotti - Winner - Partswork

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Osca MT4 1500 TN - 1956 Mille Miglia - Cabianca - 9th overall, 1st in class - Partswork

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Fiat 8V Zagato - 1956 Mille Miglia - Jossipovich - 69th overall, 17th in class - Partswork

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Alfa Romeo Giulietta Spider Special - 1956 Mille Miglia - Sanesi - DNF - Partswork

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Fiat Abarth 750 - 1956 Mille Miglia - Ogna - 147th overall, 1st in class - Brumm R304

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Ferrari 250 GT LWB Scaglietti - 1956 Mille Miglia - Gendebien -5th overall, 1st in class - Top Model 175

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Lancia Auerlia B24 Spider - 1956 Mille Miglia - Ferrari - DNF - Partswork

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BMW 507 - 1957 Mille Miglia - Henriques - DNF - Minichamps plus decals

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Jaguar D-Type - 1957 Mille Miglia - Flockhart - DNF - Brumm

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Ferrari 315S - 1957 Mille Miglia - Taruffi - Winner - Top Model Collection

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Maserati 150S - 1957 Mille Miglia - Michel - DNF - Partswork

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Maserati 200SI - 1957 Mille Miglia - Bordoni - DNF - Partswork

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Ferrari 500 TRC - 1957 Mille Miglia - Munaron - 8th overall, 1st in class - Art Models

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Fiat 1100/103 - 1957 Mille Miglia - Scrivanti - 111th overall, 2nd in class - Partswork

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Ferrari 335S - 1957 Mille Miglia - Collins - DNF - Art Models ART157

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Lotus Eleven Cimax - 1957 Mille Miglia - Grant - DNF - Partswork

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Maserati 450S - 1957 Mille Miglia - Moss - DNF - Top Model Collection TMC132

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Fiat Abarth 750 Zagato - 1957 Mille Miglia - Thiele - 62nd overall, 1st in class - Partswork

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Last edited by reeft1 on Tue Mar 28, 2017 6:31 pm, edited 16 times in total.

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reeft1
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Re: The "I blame Sir Stirling" Collection

Post by reeft1 » Sat Aug 29, 2015 2:47 pm

The Targa Florio was an open road endurance automobile race held in the mountains of Sicily near Palermo. Founded in 1906, it was the oldest sports car racing event, part of the World Sportscar Championship between 1955 and 1973. While the first races consisted of a whole tour of the island, the track length in the race's last decades was limited to the 72 kilometres (45 mi) of the Circuito Piccolo delle Madonie, which was lapped 11 times.

After 1973, it was a national sports car event until it was discontinued in 1977 due to safety concerns.

Alfa Romeo 6C 2500 Competizione - 1950 Targa Florio - Bornigia - Winner - Top Model Collection plus decals

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Alfa Romeo 6C 2500 SS - 1950 Targa Florio - Schwelm - 7th overall, 1st in class - Klaxon Easy

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Ferrari 212 MM - 1951 Targa Florio - Stagnoli - Art Model ART242 - DNF

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Lancia Aurelia - 1952 Targa Florio - Bornetto - winner - partswork plus new numbers

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Lancia D20 3000 - 1953 Targa Florio - Maglioli - winner - partswork plus new numbers

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Lancia D24 - 1954 Targa Florio - Taruffi - winner - Brumm

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Mercedes 300SLR - 1955 Targa Florio - Moss - Winner - Brumm

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Ferrari 860 Monza - 1955 Targa Florio - Castellotti - 3rd overall - Art Models

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Ferrari 750 Monza - 1955 Targa Florio - Maglioli - DNF - Best

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Porsche 550A RS - 1956 Targa Florio - Maglioli - winner - Brumm

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Alfa Romeo Giulietta Sprint - 1957 Targa Florio - Piazza - 111th overall - Partswork

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Ferrari 250 TR 58 - 1958 Targa Florio - Musso - winner - Bang

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Ferrari 250 TR 59 - 1959 Targa Forio - Behra - DNF - Brumm

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Porsche RSK - 1959 Targa Florio - Barth - Winner - Jolly Models

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Ferrari 196S - 1959 Targa Florio - Scarlatti - DNF - Jolly Model

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Porsche RS60 - 1960 Targa Florio - Bonnier - Winner - Jolly Models

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Alfa Romeo 1500 - 1960 Targa Florio - Fiordelisi - DNF - Jolly Model

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Porsche 356B Carerra Abarth GTL - 1960 Targa Florio - Strahle - 6th overall, 1st in class - Best

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Abarth 700S Spyder Tubolare - 1961 Targa Florio - Abate - DNF - Pinko PI-221

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Ferrari 246SP - 1961 Targa Florio - Von Trips - Winner - Art Models

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Ferrari 246 SP - 1962 Targa Florio - Rodriguez - winner - Art Models

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Maserati Tipo 60 - 1962 Targa Florio - Riolo - DNF - Minichamps plus decals

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Ferrari 250 California - 1962 Targa Florio - De Bonis - 19th overall, 3rd in class - Art Models ART273

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Maserati Tipo 64 - 1962 Targa Florio - DNF -Partswork
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Porsche 718 GTR - 1963 Targa Florio - Bonnier - winner - pro built Starter

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Ferrari 250P - 1963 Targa Florio - Scarfiotti - DNF - Art Models ART152

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Porsche 356B 2000 GS Carerra GT - 1963 Targa Florio - Pucci - 3rd overall, 1st in class - Spark

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Jaguar E-Type - 1963 Targa Florio - Baggio - 21st overall, 1st in class - Best

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Mini Bimotor - 1963 Targa Florio - Whitmore - 28th overall, 5th in class - Spark

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Porsche 904 GTS - 1964 Targa Florio - Davis - Winner - Spark

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AC Cobra 289 - 1964 Targa Florio - Gurney - 8th overall, 1st in class - Bang

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Ferrari 250 GTL - 1964 Targa Florio - Taormina - 13th overall, 5th in class - Best

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Ferrari 275 P2 - 1965 Targa Florio - Vaccarella - Winner - Bang base plus homemade decals

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Porsche 904-8 - 1965 Targa Florio - Davis - winner - Provence Moulage/Norev

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Ford GT40 Mk1 Spider - 1965 Targa Florio - Bondurant - DNF - Bizarre

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Ferrari 330 P3 Spider - 1966 Targa Florio - Bandini - DNF - Bang

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Porsche 906 - 1966 Targa Florio - Mairesse - winner - Ebbro

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Ferrari 206C - 1966 Targa Florio - Guichet - 2nd overall, 1st in class - Art Models

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Alfa Romeo TZ2 - 1966 Targa Florio - Pinto - 4th overall, 1st in class - Best

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Abarth 1300 OT - 1966 Targa Florio - Buzetti - DNF - Partswork plus decals

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Ferrari 275 GTB Competizione - 1966 Targa Florio - Conti - DNF - Model Box 8430

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Porsche 910 - 1967 Targa Florio - Hawkins - Winner - Ebbro base model and homemade decals

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MG MGB - GT Special - 1967 Targa Florio - Hopkirk - Not Classified - Pinko PI-269

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Lola T70 Chevrolet Mk3 - 1967 Targa Florio - Epstein - DNF - Best

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Alfa Romeo T33 Fleron - 1967 Targa Florio - Geki - DNF - Best

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Ferrari 412 - 1967 Targa Florio - Muller - DNF - Bang

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Chaparral 2F - 1967 Targa Florio - Hill - DNF - TSM 124317

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Porsche 907 2.2 - 1968 Targa Florio - Elford - winner - Schuco

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Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint Speciale - 1968 Targa Florio - Baracco - 41st overallm 5th in class - Metro partswork

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MGB - 1968 Targa Florio - Fall - 24th overall, 11th in class - Eagles Race

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Alfa Romeo 33.2 - 1969 Targa Florio - Pinto - 5th overall, 1st in class - Best

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Porsche 908/2 - 1969 Targa Florio - Mitter - winner - Best

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Abarth 2000 - 1969 Targa Florio - Bitter - 8th overall, 1st in class - Best

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Abarth 1000 - 1969 Targa Florio - Calascibetta - 11th overall, 1st in class - Best

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Lancia Fulvia F&M Special - 1969 Targa Florio - Munari - 9th overall, 2nd in class - Pinko PI-272

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Costin Nathan - 1969 Targa Florio - Markey - 46th overall - Ebbro 44906

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Porsche 908/3 - 1970 Targa Florio - Siffert - winner - Best

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Ferrari 512S - 1970 Targa Florio - Vaccarella - 3rd overall, 1st in class - Ferrari Collection

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Alfa Romeo 33.3 - 1971 Targa Florio - Vaccarella - winner - M4

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Opel GT Grp 4 - 1971 Targa Florio - Marotta - DNF - Neo 148843

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Abarth SP2000 - 1971 Targa Florio - Taramazzo - DNF - Best
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Ferrari 312 PB - 1972 Targa Florio - Merzario - winner - Brumm

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Porsche 911 Carerra RSR - 1973 Targa Florio - Muller - winner - Modified Spark base model plus Arena Modelli Decals

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Alfa Romeo Duetto Spider 1600 - 1973 Targa Florio - Barbanti - 41st overall, 5th in class - Partswork

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Alfa Romeo 33 TT12 - 1975 Targa Florio - Merzario - winner - Minichamps

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Last edited by reeft1 on Thu May 25, 2017 5:47 pm, edited 14 times in total.

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reeft1
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Re: The "I blame Sir Stirling" Collection

Post by reeft1 » Sat Aug 29, 2015 2:49 pm

The Carrera Panamericana was a border-to-border sedan and sports car racing event on open roads in Mexico similar to the Mille Miglia and Targa Florio in Italy. Running for five consecutive years from 1950 to 1954, it was widely held by contemporaries to be the most dangerous race of any type in the world.

Ferrari 212 Inter Vignale - 1951 Carerra Panamericana - Taruffi - Winner - Partswork plus decals

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Delahaye 175S - 1951 Carerra Panamericana - Chiron - DNF - Partswork plus decals

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Mercedes 300SL - 1952 Carerra Panamericana - Kling - Winner - Minichamps

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Mercedes Benz 300 SL Spyder - 1952 Carerra Panamericana - Fitch - DNF - Partswork

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Ferrari 340 Ghia - 1952 Carerra Panamericana - McAfeen - 5th overall - Jolly Model JL0155

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Ferrari 340 Mexico Vignale Berlinetta - 1952 Carerra Panamericana - Chinetti - 3rd overall - Top Model Collection

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Lancia D24 Pinin Farina - 1953 Carerra Panamericana - Fangio - Winner - Brumm

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Porsche 550 Coupe - 1953 Carerra Panamericana - Herran - 32nd overall, 1st in class - Jolly Model

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Porsche 356 SL - 1953 Carerra Panamericana - Contreras - DNF - Brumm S019

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Porsche 356 - 1953 Carerra Panamericana - Evans - DNF - Detail Cars Art 227

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Ferrari 375 MM Pinin Farina Berlinetta - 1953 Carerra Panamericana - Mancini -4th overall - Art Model 282

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Cadillac Series 62 - 1953 Carerra Panamericana - Stringer - DNF - Vitesse L040

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Gordini T24S - 1953 Carerra Panamericana - Behra - DNF - Top Model Collection TMC121B

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Gordini T16S - 1953 Carerra Panamericana - Lucas - DNF - Top Model Collection TMC091 DD4

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Talbot Lago T26GS - 1953 Carerra Panamericana - Rosier - 5th overall - Top Model Collection TMC148

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Lincoln Cadillac Ham Special - 1953 Carerra Panamericana - Ham - DSQ Over Time Limit - Provence Moulage

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Jaguar XK120 Hardtop - 1953 Carerra Panamericana - Giron - 25th overall - Brumm base plus decals

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Ferrari 375 Plus Pinin Farina - 1954 Carerra Panamericana - Maglioli - winner - Top Model Collection

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Porsche 550 RS - 1954 Carerra Panamericana - Herrmann - 3rd overall, 1st in class - Brumm R275

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Buick Century - 1954 Carerra Panamericana - Ramierz - 17th overall, 6th in class - TSM

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Volkswagen 1200 De Luxe - 1954 Carerra Panamericana - de Hohenlohe - 78th overall, 7th in class - Vitesse

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Chevrolet Corvette - 1954 Carerra Panamericana - Von Esser - DNF - Precision Miniatures base, plus decals

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Last edited by reeft1 on Sun Mar 12, 2017 3:52 pm, edited 8 times in total.

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Alfaholic
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Re: The "I blame Sir Stirling" Collection

Post by Alfaholic » Sat Aug 29, 2015 6:29 pm

I think I'm going to like this thread - lots of Italian metal and a wide variety of models.

I understand where you are coming from, I have started a small theme of Mille Miglia winners, but my inspiration came from Tazio Nuvolari and Alfa Roneo's successes.
Martin

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Tom
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Re: The "I blame Sir Stirling" Collection

Post by Tom » Sat Aug 29, 2015 7:55 pm

Excellent collection, like it a lot!

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Re: The "I blame Sir Stirling" Collection

Post by DeadCanDanceR » Sat Aug 29, 2015 8:13 pm

What a great collection! :)
-Julio-

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Ozmac
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Re: The "I blame Sir Stirling" Collection

Post by Ozmac » Sat Aug 29, 2015 10:13 pm

I agree with the others, great collection and many wonderful stories behind all the wonderful cars.

What a pleasure it would have been to be a spectator back then, watching that kind of parade of machinery roaring through the countryside.

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reeft1
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Re: The "I blame Sir Stirling" Collection

Post by reeft1 » Sun Aug 30, 2015 3:18 am

Thanks gents for the nice comments

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jj2728
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Re: The "I blame Sir Stirling" Collection

Post by jj2728 » Sun Aug 30, 2015 4:32 pm

Great collection and I have a few of the same cars.

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Re: The "I blame Sir Stirling" Collection

Post by grinbergs » Mon Aug 31, 2015 3:50 am

Nice selection of cars and so rich with history. Many of the cars very much to my taste. Even some non red ones... ;) :D

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Re: The "I blame Sir Stirling" Collection

Post by guitardave_1 » Mon Aug 31, 2015 3:07 pm

Mr Moss certainly has quite a collection to answer for! I have no trouble understanding how you got sucked in though Paul - the events were quite extraordinary, and the cars are varied and often very pretty. Thoroughly terrifying however! I'd like to represent them better in my own collection, but you have the proof that it can spiral!
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Re: The "I blame Sir Stirling" Collection

Post by JSB33 » Wed Sep 02, 2015 9:17 am

Extremely enjoyable thread, thanks so much for taking the time to post this.
Jeff
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Re: The "I blame Sir Stirling" Collection

Post by R32Dave » Thu Sep 03, 2015 4:31 pm

Great post Paul.
I'd like to bone up on these classic old races of yesteryear...racing was so different back then!
Thanks for the detail.
D

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reeft1
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Re: The "I blame Sir Stirling" Collection

Post by reeft1 » Thu Sep 03, 2015 5:55 pm

Once again, many thanks gents. I have a few more models to add to this thread over forthcoming days.

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Re: The "I blame Sir Stirling" Collection

Post by Jager » Fri Sep 04, 2015 9:21 am

What an interesting collection. I know how easily one or two cars can lead to an entirely new theme.

Have you seen this diorama of the 1956 Mille Miglia - maybe it will give you a few ideas.

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“Racing is life. Anything before or after is just waiting.” - Steve McQueen

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reeft1
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Re: The "I blame Sir Stirling" Collection

Post by reeft1 » Sun Sep 06, 2015 2:49 pm

very smart!

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Re: The "I blame Sir Stirling" Collection

Post by JSB33 » Sun Sep 13, 2015 10:16 am

It really is!
Jeff
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reeft1
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Re: The "I blame Sir Stirling" Collection

Post by reeft1 » Sat Sep 19, 2015 6:59 am

I've inserted these additions in to the above picture thread to maintain the chronology:

Ferrari 166 MM Barchetta Touring - 1950 Mille Miglia - Bracco - 4th overall, 1st in class - Art Models
Jaguar C-Type - 1952 Mille Miglia - Moss - DNF - Brumm
Lancia D24 Spider - 1954 Mille Miglia - Ascari - Winner - Partswork
Fiat 8V Zagato - 1956 Mille Miglia - Jossipovich - 69th overall, 17th in class - Partswork

Ferrari 212 Inter Vignale - 1951 Carerra Panamericana - Taruffi - Winner - Partswork plus decals
Mercedes 300SL - 1952 Carerra Panamericana - Kling - Winner - Minichamps
Lancia D24 Pinin Farina - 1953 Carerra Panamericana - Fangio - Winner - Brumm

Alfa Romeo 6C 2500 Competizione - 1950 Targa Florio - Bornigia - Winner - Top Model Collection plus decals
Mercedes 300SLR - 1955 Targa Florio - Moss - Winner - Brumm
Porsche RSK - 1959 Targa Florio - Barth - WInner - Jolly Models
Porsche RS60 - 1960 Targa Florio - Bonnier - Winner - Jolly Models
Ferrari 246SP - 1961 Targa Florio - Von Trips - Winner - Art Models
Maserati Tipo 60 - 1962 Targa Florio - Riolo - DNF - Minichamps plus decals
Abarth 1000 - 1969 Targa Florio - Calascibetta - 11th overall, 1st in class - Best
Ferrari 512S - 1970 Targa Florio - Vaccarella - 3rd overall, 1st in class - Ferrari Collection

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Re: The "I blame Sir Stirling" Collection

Post by Tom » Sat Sep 19, 2015 7:17 am

Must... resist...

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reeft1
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Re: The "I blame Sir Stirling" Collection

Post by reeft1 » Fri Oct 02, 2015 4:20 pm

A few more have been added to the timeline.

Porsche 904 GTS - 1964 Targa Florio - Davis - Winner - Spark
Ferrari 340 America Berlinetta Vignale - 1951 Mille Miglia - Villoresi - Winner - Jolly Models ("pranged" version)
Ferrari 250S Berlinetta Vignale - 1952 Mille Miglia - Bracco - Winner - Jolly Models

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enzoferrari
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Re: The "I blame Sir Stirling" Collection

Post by enzoferrari » Sun Oct 11, 2015 4:52 pm

Tom wrote:Must... resist...
I agree, this is very tempting, I have a modest Mille Miglia collection, and a diorama is a great idea for
display.
Collectors Automotive Replica Society
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Jager
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Re: The "I blame Sir Stirling" Collection

Post by Jager » Thu Oct 15, 2015 6:37 am

Thought this would make a neat collection in 1:43 as a continuation of this thread :

Image
“Racing is life. Anything before or after is just waiting.” - Steve McQueen

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reeft1
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Re: The "I blame Sir Stirling" Collection

Post by reeft1 » Thu Oct 15, 2015 2:49 pm

Nice picture - i'm missing 2 but both are builds in progress - the number 228 (1967) and number 8 (1973) cars which i'm modifying from Shucho and Spark base models as I couldn't find either at a sensible price in the UK.

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